May You Live In Interesting Times – Maria Kreyn

A solo exhibition of work by Maria Kreyn

August 19th – September 9th, 2017

Opening reception August 19th at 7pm

Maria Kreyn _ 12.11. 12. 17. 12.42 pilgrims graphite on mylar

 

Booth Gallery is pleased to present May You Live In Interesting Times, an exhibition of drawings by Maria Kreyn. In these dynamic compositions, Kreyn uses graphite to depict scenes of humanity that convey both emotional depth and intimacy. The exhibition takes its name from a purported Chinese curse, and while the works examine darkness, they do not dwell in the negative. Her expressive use of light and shadow describe of the passage of time, and repeatedly touch on the commonalities of the great themes the human condition.

Kreyn’s imagery often mines traditional western art historical iconography, as well as industrial and wartime photography. Her compositions are montages that seem to celebrate contradiction and the unpredictable nature of the future. The cumulative effect is that of a recording of history, a documentary, personal or otherwise, depicted in a non-linear, existentialist manner. In Hands, a drawing that depicts a set of Dürer-like hands covered with pigment, the use of charcoal itself becomes of a metaphor for the very act of creation. i.e. The work of being an artist is sullying in and of itself, and getting dirty is vital to the creative process. In this image, charcoal dust seems to be a metaphor for both drawing and for quite viscerally being the very stuff of life.

In Pilgrims, she depicts three reclining figures in foreshortened views that recall Mantegna’s Lamentation of Christ. Their lower legs each give off cast shadows that seem to depict perspective on a consistent ground plane where the three figures lie exhausted, resting, recuperating. Our eye level as a viewer is on the same ground plane. The result is that the scene becomes a commonality. Their journey is ours; too, Kreyn seems to say.

Nautical themes are common in Kreyn’s work and the piece Elections, What Goes Up seems to evoke The Odyssey and its famous captain and charismatic leader Ulysses. But in Kreyn’s more Expressionist image, the narrative is more contemporary (20th century uniforms) and secular. The central figure, to which all hands are reaching up to from the lower deck, has no supernatural powers to save the day, no Athena to bail him out of trouble or shore up his character flaws. He is a leader who is joined in suffering with his fellow sailors, in their moment of confusion and despair as they face the storm together.

The opening reception for May You Live In Interesting Times will be hosted Saturday, August 19th, 2017, at 7pm. The reception is open to the public, and the exhibition is on view through September 9th, 2017. For inquiries, or to request a collector preview of the exhibition, please email paulboothgallery@gmail.com.

Embraced – Sculptures by Ronit Baranga

A solo exhibition of sculptures by Ronit Baranga

August 19th – September 9th, 2017

Opening reception August 19th at 7pm

RBS_2466e

On Saturday, August 19th, 2017, Booth Gallery is pleased to present “Embraced”, a solo exhibition of sculptures by Ronit Baranga. In her new series, Baranga blurs the border between living and still by depicting human mouths and fingers emerging from common tableware. “Embraced” examines ideas surrounding internal personas and how those personas interact with their environment. Baranga reimagines fine china with sensual organs, casting pieces as active objects. The china is now aware of itself and can interact with its surroundings. Sets lean on each other, pinching, hugging, and embracing. Between pain and pleasure, their ceramic bodies react to

Baranga reimagines fine china with sensual organs, casting pieces as active objects. The china is now aware of itself and can interact with its surroundings. Sets lean on each other, pinching, hugging, and embracing. Between pain and pleasure, their ceramic bodies react to unique experience.

Baranga’s creations remain autonomous in their behavior within the situations presented to them. Their free will reflects Baranga’s spontaneity in the creation of her works, as she sculpts her ceramics just as how she sees them in her imagination.

Ronit Baranga is an Israeli contemporary artist who has always been attracted to creating art. Once she became introduced to clay, she became quickly addicted to the medium. Her figurative artwork deals with emotional states and relationships. Baranga’s creations have been displayed in museums and galleries around the world and are a part of many museum and private collections. Key exhibitions include international shows in Taiwan and China (2011, 2012), the Triennale Design Museum in Milan (2012) and Banksy’s Dismaland (2015), where she exhibited alongside many world-renown artists, which include Banksy and Damien Hirst. Baranga holds a B.A. in Psychology and Hebrew Literature from Haifa University, studied Art History in Tel-Aviv University, and Fine Arts in Beit Berl College (‘HaMidrasha’), Israel. Her work has been reviewed and featured in numerous magazines and blogs, printed and online, including Colossal, Hi-Fructose, Juxtapoz, Vision Magazine (China), The Huffington Post, Elephant (UK), Dangerous Minds and many others.

The opening reception for “Embraced” will be hosted Saturday, August 19th, 2017, at 7pm at Booth Gallery. The reception is open to the public, and the exhibition is on view through September 9th, 2017. For inquiries, or to request a collector preview of the exhibition, please email paulboothgallery@gmail.com.

Odd Nerdrum – “In Limbo”

 

Solemorte

Odd Nerdrum, “Solemorte“, oil on canvas, 81″ x 89”

A solo exhibition of works by Odd Nerdrum at the Yu-Hsiu Museum of Art

Organized by Booth Gallery

Exhibition dates: May 7th- August 20th, 2017

 

On Sunday, May 7th, 2017, Booth Gallery is pleased to announce Odd Nerdrum’s first museum solo exhibition in Asia, “In Limbo“. The exhibition, organized by Booth Gallery, will be on view at the Yu-Hsiu Museum of Art through August 8, 2017 “In Limbo” features some of Nerdrum’s most notable work.

Odd Nerdrum’s solo exhibition, In Limbo, takes its title from his painting Limbo, 2006, suggesting that the figures in all his paintings are in limbo. Despite their different appearances and situations, the figures reveal entangled and ambiguous feelings and emotions as well as intriguing situations. According to the Roman Catholic Church, “limbo” is the abode of unbaptized but innocent or righteous souls, as those of infants or virtuous individuals who lived before the coming of Christ. They were not baptized; and because they lacked faith in God, they could never be saved.

In addition, the figures in Nerdrum’s paintings are not great personages. Contrarily, they are ordinary young and aged men and women that form a collective symbol of humanity. They live in the limbo of their own making, find themselves in dangerous situations or in solitude, and the only thing they have in common is that they all suffer. Nerdrum’s delineation of the figures’ expression is metaphoric and predictive; and the desolate landscape that is the backdrop of his paintings foregrounds the humanity he has never stopped portraying. While enshrouding people in a strong sense of detachment, Nerdrum’s work still conveys his humanistic concerns and demonstrates the artistic legacy of past masters, which he has internalized and transformed into his creative philosophy and inspiration.

For a digital exhibition catalogue of the exhibition, please email paulboothgallery@gmail.com.