The New Baroque

November 18th – January 13th, 2017

An exhibition curated by Rob Zeller and Casey Gleghorn
Based on The Figurative Artist’s Handbook
Booth Gallery 325 W. 38th St. New York, NY 10018

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Chie Shimizu, “The Story of the River”, 37”, Ultra-cal, Plaster & Pigment

On Saturday, November 18th, Booth Gallery is pleased to present The New Baroque a group exhibition co-curated by Rob Zeller and Casey Gleghorn featuring an astonishing culmination of works by 22 of the most talented contemporary figurative artists working today.

The New Baroque was inspired by the artist and co-curator Rob Zeller’s new book on the exciting resurgence of the figure in art, The Figurative Artist’s Handbook. Much like the Baroque period, the diverse array of artists in this exhibition speak to contemporary political, personal and formal artistic concerns using a common, figurative language in uniquely personal styles. While the book was used as a starting point, Zeller and Booth Gallery Director, Casey Gleghorn have moved beyond the scope of the printed text. They have added some artists not included in the original printing, both painters and sculptors, to reflect a broader spectrum of new and exciting voices in the figurative movement.

The original Baroque, an effort largely financed by the Catholic Church as a reaction to the Protestant Reformation, favored the “Blockbuster”, large-scale dramatic paintings of Biblical scenes that illustrated how this material world interacted with the Divine, the spiritual. Entirely secular in nature and more personal in scale, this exhibition also features artists who dig deeper than the mere appearance of things, the first level of realism. They are asking bigger questions of personal and metaphysical concerns, using the figure and its environment as a foil to explore the nature of existence. While this show offers up a diverse array of 22 contemporary figurative artists, it is richly steeped in a dialogue with artists of the past. Because figurative art has been in existence prior to the Egyptians, there is a deep well of experience for contemporary artists to draw upon. Chie Shimizu’s two sculptures, Untitled No.15 and The Story of the River, are rooted in an interesting fusion of western and traditional Japanese aesthetics. Shimizu’s work features subjects best read as iconic stand-ins for humanity, general rather than specific. They are meditations on our finite relationship to the infinite.

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Alex Kanevsky, “The Most Sinister Model”, 30” x 22”, Graphite on Paper

In Alex Kanevsky’s two drawings in the show, The Most Sinister Model and T.S we see figures drawn with a kinetic rhythm of staccato movements. In his method, Kanevsky leaves behind both the evidence of a grid and the ghost contours of the model’s previous positions. It is as if we are watching their movements through time-lapse photography. Kanevsky’s intent is not to capture specificity, but rather to capture movement. Eschewing the use of value to create form, his rhythmic line quality is reminiscent of Giacometti’s and that artist’s efforts to both place the figure in space and reveal our relationship to it.

Christian Johnson’s highly original wall-mounted, cut out drawing features a sensual, curvaceous contour that at first call to mind the Viennese Fin de siècle of Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele, but the muted grey tonalities of his modeling is more closely evocative of Jasper John’s cool, intellectual Modernism. Johnson concerns are of a formal nature, but the space between the viewer and the beautiful pose of the model is quite intimate. He draws feminine beauty distilled to its essence.

christian johnsonChristian Johnson, Untitled, 4’ x 5’, Graphite and Charcoal on Paper

Few artists working today are as Neoclassical in their understanding of form as Camie Salaz. Her working method is entirely rooted in the French Academic system of the late 19th century. In Narcissus, a story alternately of vanity and self-loathing, Salaz shows a terrible moment of anguish as Narcissus struggles to tear himself away from his own reflection, yet he is gripped tightly by it and cannot escape. Cleverly, we cannot see the reflection, but only a single, powerful arm as it pulls him down to certain death. As dramatic as the mythology of Ovid it draws upon, Salaz’s Narcissus feels surprisingly contemporary in its use of violence.

salazCamie Salaz, Narcissus, 30” x 40”, Oil on Linen

Some of the artists in this exhibition convey narrative through the use of single figures, in isolation, and others tell stories through the use of multiple figure composition, as we see in the case of Bo Bartlett’s enigmatic work, Diaspora. Here, we witness a scene with a lot of activity going on and much iconic imagery. The classical elements of Nature are present: Earth, Fire, Water and Air, as is a masculine/feminine duality. Two females embrace in the center of the composition, and a masculine hero figure, walks towards us carrying an unconscious young woman in his arms, as if he pulled her from the fire. We experience this narrative in close proximity, but no clarity is provided. We are not clear as to what is taking place, nor what it means. Diaspora Bartlett’s work often raises as many questions as it answers.

BoBartlett - Diaspora SMLBo Bartlett, Diaspora, 2016, oil on linen, 82″ x 100″

Artists participating in the exhibition include:

Steven Assael, Bo Bartlett, Aleah Chapin, Carl Dobsky, Randall Exon, Zoey Frank, Alex Kanevsky, David Kassan, Kurt Kauper, Evan Kitson, Maria Kreyn, Brad Kunkle, Christian Johnson, Adam Miller, Matthew Miller, Alyssa Monks, Odd Nerdrum, Ashley Oubre, Camie Salaz, Chie Shimizu, Nicola Verlato and Rob Zeller.

The opening reception for The New Baroque will be hosted Saturday, November 18th, 2017, at 7 pm at Booth Gallery, 325 W 38th St #1, New York, NY 10018. The reception is open to the public. The exhibition is on view through January 13th, 2018. For inquiries, or to request a collector preview of the exhibition, please email paulboothgallery@gmail.com.

Eric Lacombe – ANOMALIES: Lines, Forms, Textures

New paintings by Eric Lacombe
September 16th – 30th, 2017

EXTENDED BY POPULAR DEMAND
Select works from “Anomalies” will now be on view through October 21st, 2017

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On Saturday, September 16th, 2017, Booth Gallery is pleased to present “Anomalies: Lines, Forms, Textures” a solo exhibition featuring astonishing new works by Eric Lacombe. The exhibition is a culmination of new works, which highlight the many facets of imperfections and their societal perceptions.The term “anomaly” is defined as something that deviates from what is standard, normal, or expected. Quite suitably, Lacombe’s “anomalies” portray the imperfect deviations that ostracize his subjects into a haunted world. The “imperfect” and experimental process that birthed this new collection of work reflects who Eric Lacombe is as an artist, as well as those who find resonance with his creations. Like many of us, his anomalies are seeking new information on who their true personas might be. Lacombe portrays this fragility by building thick textures of varying form around hollow, melancholic eyes that stare woefully in question at the viewer. His works incorporate blueprint-

The term “anomaly” is defined as something that deviates from what is standard, normal, or expected. Quite suitably, Lacombe’s “anomalies” portray the imperfect deviations that ostracize his subjects into a haunted world. The “imperfect” and experimental process that birthed this new collection of work reflects who Eric Lacombe is as an artist, as well as those who find resonance with his creations. Like many of us, his anomalies are seeking new information on who their true personas might be. Lacombe portrays this fragility by building thick textures of varying form around hollow, melancholic eyes that stare woefully in question at the viewer. His works incorporate blueprint-esque symbols within his imagery, lending varying analyses to his subject matter and his process. Some pieces incorporate this technique to help illustrate missing components, lending thought to feelings we may measure as commonplace and the emptiness we sometimes habitually exhibit on our stone-cold faces. Eric Lacombe is a multi-skilled, self-taught French artist who has developed a strong, recognizable approach to his subject matter, crafting haunted figures who remain trapped within a miasma of textures. There is a great depth to his works, with textures that push and pull to enhance the emotions and grit of his subject matter. Eric’s works are void of urgency, and instead feel patiently concrete; stagnant figures with nowhere to go, trapped by their own heavy emotions and eternally lost in their current state of thought. Lacombe’s prolific use of texture lends itself to simultaneously subduing and pronouncing the subject matter, reflecting the consistency of dour emotions which climb and fall in our minds; by this, his pieces are strong representations of the ever-faltering mind which can hinder our self-perceptions. Much like the mixed media paintings, his sculptures exhibit turbulent feelings, capturing fragmented pieces that tell the story of a larger whole. The opening reception for “Anomalies: Lines, Forms, Textures” will be hosted Saturday, September 16th, 2017, at 7 pm at Booth Gallery, 325 W 38th St #1, New York, NY 10018. The reception is open to the public and the artist will be in attendance. The exhibition is on view through September 30th, 2017. For inquiries, or to request a collector preview of the exhibition, please email paulboothgallery@gmail.com.

Eric Lacombe is a multi-skilled, self-taught, French artist who has developed a strong, recognizable approach to his subject matter, crafting haunted figures who remain trapped within a miasma of textures. There is a great depth to his works, with textures that push and pull to enhance the emotions and grit of his subject matter. Eric’s works are void of urgency, and instead feel patiently concrete; stagnant figures with nowhere to go, trapped by their own heavy emotions and eternally lost in their current state of thought. Lacombe’s prolific use of texture lends itself to simultaneously subduing and pronouncing the subject matter, reflecting the consistency of dour emotions which climb and fall in our minds; by this, his pieces are strong representations of the ever-faltering mind which can hinder our self-perceptions. Much like the mixed media paintings, his sculptures exhibit turbulent feelings, capturing fragmented pieces that tell the story of a larger whole.

The opening reception for “Anomalies: Lines, Forms, Textures” will be hosted Saturday, September 16th, 2017, at 7 pm at Booth Gallery, 325 W 38th St #1, New York, NY 10018. The reception is open to the public and the artist will be in attendance. The exhibition is on view through September 30th, 2017. For inquiries, or to request a collector preview of the exhibition, please email paulboothgallery@gmail.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

May You Live In Interesting Times – Maria Kreyn

A solo exhibition of work by Maria Kreyn

August 19th – September 9th, 2017

Opening reception August 19th at 7pm

Maria Kreyn _ 12.11. 12. 17. 12.42 pilgrims graphite on mylar

 

Booth Gallery is pleased to present May You Live In Interesting Times, an exhibition of drawings by Maria Kreyn. In these dynamic compositions, Kreyn uses graphite to depict scenes of humanity that convey both emotional depth and intimacy. The exhibition takes its name from a purported Chinese curse, and while the works examine darkness, they do not dwell in the negative. Her expressive use of light and shadow describe of the passage of time, and repeatedly touch on the commonalities of the great themes the human condition.

Kreyn’s imagery often mines traditional western art historical iconography, as well as industrial and wartime photography. Her compositions are montages that seem to celebrate contradiction and the unpredictable nature of the future. The cumulative effect is that of a recording of history, a documentary, personal or otherwise, depicted in a non-linear, existentialist manner. In Hands, a drawing that depicts a set of Dürer-like hands covered with pigment, the use of charcoal itself becomes of a metaphor for the very act of creation. i.e. The work of being an artist is sullying in and of itself, and getting dirty is vital to the creative process. In this image, charcoal dust seems to be a metaphor for both drawing and for quite viscerally being the very stuff of life.

In Pilgrims, she depicts three reclining figures in foreshortened views that recall Mantegna’s Lamentation of Christ. Their lower legs each give off cast shadows that seem to depict perspective on a consistent ground plane where the three figures lie exhausted, resting, recuperating. Our eye level as a viewer is on the same ground plane. The result is that the scene becomes a commonality. Their journey is ours; too, Kreyn seems to say.

Nautical themes are common in Kreyn’s work and the piece Elections, What Goes Up seems to evoke The Odyssey and its famous captain and charismatic leader Ulysses. But in Kreyn’s more Expressionist image, the narrative is more contemporary (20th century uniforms) and secular. The central figure, to which all hands are reaching up to from the lower deck, has no supernatural powers to save the day, no Athena to bail him out of trouble or shore up his character flaws. He is a leader who is joined in suffering with his fellow sailors, in their moment of confusion and despair as they face the storm together.

The opening reception for May You Live In Interesting Times will be hosted Saturday, August 19th, 2017, at 7pm. The reception is open to the public, and the exhibition is on view through September 9th, 2017. For inquiries, or to request a collector preview of the exhibition, please email paulboothgallery@gmail.com.

Embraced – Sculptures by Ronit Baranga

A solo exhibition of sculptures by Ronit Baranga

August 19th – September 9th, 2017

Opening reception August 19th at 7pm

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On Saturday, August 19th, 2017, Booth Gallery is pleased to present “Embraced”, a solo exhibition of sculptures by Ronit Baranga. In her new series, Baranga blurs the border between living and still by depicting human mouths and fingers emerging from common tableware. “Embraced” examines ideas surrounding internal personas and how those personas interact with their environment.

Baranga reimagines fine china with sensual organs, casting pieces as active objects. The china is now aware of itself and can interact with its surroundings. Sets lean on each other, pinching, hugging, and embracing. Between pain and pleasure, their ceramic bodies react to unique experiences.

Baranga’s creations remain autonomous in their behavior within the situations presented to them. Their free will reflects Baranga’s spontaneity in the creation of her works, as she sculpts her ceramics just as how she sees them in her imagination.

Ronit Baranga is an Israeli contemporary artist who has always been attracted to creating art. Once she became introduced to clay, she became quickly addicted to the medium. Her figurative artwork deals with emotional states and relationships.

Baranga’s creations have been displayed in museums and galleries around the world and are a part of many museum and private collections. Key exhibitions include international shows in Taiwan and China (2011, 2012), the Triennale Design Museum in Milan (2012) and Banksy’s Dismaland (2015), where she exhibited alongside many world-renown artists, which include Banksy and Damien Hirst.

Baranga holds a B.A. in Psychology and Hebrew Literature from Haifa University, studied Art History in Tel-Aviv University, and Fine Arts in Beit Berl College (‘HaMidrasha’), Israel.

Her work has been reviewed and featured in numerous magazines and blogs, printed and online, including Colossal, Hi-Fructose, Juxtapoz, Vision Magazine (China), The Huffington Post, Elephant (UK), Dangerous Minds and many others.

The opening reception for “Embraced” will be hosted Saturday, August 19th, 2017, at 7pm at Booth Gallery. The reception is open to the public, and the exhibition is on view through September 9th, 2017. For inquiries, or to request a collector preview of the exhibition, please email paulboothgallery@gmail.com.

Tire Fire – Drawings By Jesse Draxler

TIREFIRE_CARD_FRONT (1)

 

On Saturday, July 8th, 2017, Booth Gallery is pleased to present Jesse Draxler in his first exhibition comprised solely of drawings entitled, “Tire Fire”. The exhibition is a culmination of new works, which presented new challenges and required genuine self-exploration in order to find where a focus on the medium would take him.

Tire fires, where tires are stored, dumped, or processed, exist in two forms: as fast-burning events, leading to almost immediate loss of control, and as slow-burning pyrolysis that can continue for over a decade. They are noted for being difficult to extinguish.

To spark a vigorous drawing practice Draxler began by obtaining a large stack of paper. Being that his approach always begins with experimentation, he knew he needed a disposable amount of substrate. Within minutes of starting on each sheet he knew whether or not he was happy with the direction of the work, at which point he would move the drawing onto either a save pile or a slop pile. Later on the save pile was further curated; some were completed, while most others found their way to the slop. The save pile ended up in frames, while each sheet in the slop pile was painted black and now make up The Tower installation. The framed works along with The Tower installation are the yin and yang of “Tire Fire”, two interdependent sides of the same practice.

For Draxler, plumbing the darkness of his past was at times enlightening and at other times quite unflattering. Regardless of the reflection he saw through his work, from higher self to the perverse, that is where he wanted to draw from both literally and figuratively, creating pieces void of contrived grandiose statements or over sentimentalities.

Where I was drawing from within became much more important than what I was drawing. I felt I had little control over how I was drawing, in what style, or if I was able to draw in a self-satisfying manner that day at all. I learned to recognize these things and work with them, rather than to struggle against. To draw intuitively when I could, and when I couldn’t, to work on the Tower installation instead. Walking away plays a big role in my practice.

Draxler draws a parallel between his return to drawing, the medium in which his love of image making began, and the return to the self which he experienced during the creation of these works. His drawing style evolved as he revisited influences of his past including album covers and comic books, which remain two of his main influences today. Honesty became one of the main tenants of his practice: about where and what he comes from, and the role his environment played into his artistic development.

 

Jesse Draxler is a Los Angeles based artist best known for his collage and mixed media works, though drawing has always been at the heart of his practice. As a child growing up in rural Wisconsin Draxler drew incessantly. Being that his father was a mechanic he would spend hours upon hours drawing cars, trucks, and engine parts. Later in adolescence, his attention changed as circumstances became bleak.

Draxler’s mother was in a near-fatal car accident when he was nine. Upon her recovery, over a year later, his parents were divorced. His mother, whom he was now living with, soon remarried. Then just months after the wedding she was run over and killed by her new husband in his truck, an event to which he arrived just moments later.

In the following years, Draxler states that he barely remembers a thing. These times of pervasive uncertainty and loss changed him forever and his focus shifted to much darker interests. He was always an outcast from his peers, but from this time on Draxler leaned into his outsider lot in life. It wasn’t until almost two decades later that he began to see a light at the end of a very dark tunnel.

Themes of bewilderment, isolation, ambiguity, and absurdity are all strongly represented in Draxler’s work, along with frustration and aggression. Yet these are not endpoints but have rather become the in-roads to deeper understanding and acceptance. It is clear he has spent the better part of his life straddling the line between fear and ecstasy, the beautiful and the grotesque. The result is Draxler’s unique ability to present a point of view in which the subtle nuances of the human condition are concisely illuminated, satisfying a psychological and emotional itch that so seldom gets scratched.

 

The opening reception for “Tire Fire” will be hosted Saturday, July 8th, 2017, from 7-11pm at Booth Gallery. The reception is open to the public, and the exhibition is on view through August 12th, 2017. For inquiries, or to request a collector preview of the exhibition, please email paulboothgallery@gmail.com.

Solace – Adam Miller, Jean-Paul Mallozzi & Lou Ros

June 3rd – July 1st, 2017

Opening reception Saturday, June 3rd at 7 pm

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Adam Miller, “A Dream Of Paradise Remembered by the Morning Light”, Oil on canvas, 78″ x 68″ 


“Solace”

An Exhibition Of Three Figurative Artists:
Jean-Paul Mallozzi, Adam Miller and Lou Ros

On Saturday, June 3rd, 2017, Booth Galley is pleased to present Solace, an exhibition featuring the work of  Jean-Paul Mallozzi, Adam Miller and Lou Ros.  The artist’s work is collectively centered on themes regarding the struggle to retain memory and identity on both an individual and a national level, each artist handling the resolution of narratives in an existential and personal way.

Jean-Paul Mallozzi paints figures that inhabit their environment in isolation, even in groupings that denote relationships. He depicts an emotional state that has been represented by colorfully abstracted, thick pools of saturated paint. The faces and identity of the figures have been purposefully distorted, so as not to be read in an analytic fashion, but rather poignantly felt. His figures find solace in each other, or from within.

Adam Miller orchestrates grand themes in a Grand Manner straight out of the 16th Century Baroque.  In his enormous painting “Quebec”, he takes on the two incredible tasks at once. One, he tells the story of a nation’s struggle for autonomy in the face of racism, class struggle, and the inevitable in-fighting that every revolution faces. And two, he takes on the mantle of History Painting, once considered the highest form of painting in the West, and which has not been attempted on a level this ambitious in decades. The pictorial space his figures inhabit a space that evokes the aerial distortions of a Tiepolo copula.  Miller’s composition features over a hundred figures, from indigenous tribes to influential politicians, all swept up in a Wagnerian operatic version of the Quebecois rallying call of “Je me Souviens”(I remember). 

Lou Ros is a self-taught, former graffiti artist whose Expressionistic portraits and multiple figure compositions are painted in the pale colors of faded nostalgia. His bittersweet imagery conveys a sense of loss, of remembered details that evoke a memory but not are enough to bring it clearly to the forefront of consciousness.  In not saying too much, he says more, leaving the unfinished narratives up to the viewer to resolve. 

The opening reception for Jean-Paul Mallozzi, Adam Miller, and Lou Ros will be hosted Saturday, June 3rd, 2017, from 7-11pm at Booth Gallery. The reception is open to the public, and the exhibition is on view through July 1st, 2017.

For inquiries, or to request a collector preview of the exhibition, please email paulboothgallery@gmail.com.

 

Subliminal – Jason Shawn Alexander and Stephanie Inagaki

Submiminal web

On Saturday, May 6th, 2017, Booth Gallery is pleased to present “Subliminal”, a two-person exhibition of new works by Los Angeles-based artists Jason Shawn Alexander and Stephanie Inagaki. Alexander and Inagaki assume different approaches to their art, using different mediums, styles, and processes. However, the intent and subject of lives portrayed in their images are where the works in “Subliminal” converge. Whether the style is decorative or expressionistic, their end result is art that refuses to be void of emotion.

Alexander creates towering pieces, that impose their magnitude upon the viewer. These life-sized figures communicate through body language and expressionistic abstractions. Alternatively, Inagaki’s mixed media works portray characters that hold direct eye contact with the viewer, daring them to seek meaning within her mythologically-based narratives. Both Inagaki and Alexander’s figures are vessels for stories, purposed to transfer emotion and human experience. 

“You cannot simply hang either of our works “safely” on the wall. The work for this show is challenging, both in the interpretation of the lives being portrayed and directly due to the images “seeing” the viewer or the imposing scale. These works have much more going on than simply figurative art. These are works that tell stories. Our stories, told through figurative work. Some of it is right there, splashed in front of you, but most of it is in the subtitles, almost subliminal.” — Jason Shawn Alexander

Jason Shawn Alexander is a self-described expressionist, figurative painter, whose subjects embody the “vulnerability, fear, and underlying strength that comes from [Alexander’s] rural upbringing” in Tennessee. His painting is characterised by the exaggeration of his subjects’ expressions and proportions, thickly applied paint, murky palette, ethereal presences hiding beneath layers of paint, and the intrusion of text into the illusionistic space of the image. Before he devoted his time to painting, Alexander worked as a draftsman for comic book publishers such as Marvel, DC Comics, and Dark Horse. While he continued to make graphic illustrations, it was not until 2012 that these were shown alongside his paintings. Alexander lists among his influences Francis Bacon, Anselm Kiefer, and Cy Twombly.

A Southern California native, Stephanie Inagaki received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from Boston University’s College of Fine Arts and her Master of Fine Arts from the San Francisco Art Institute. After studying abroad in Italy and living in major cities around the United States, she has returned to her roots to establish herself as a multifaceted artist in Los Angeles.

The opening reception for Jason Shawn Alexander and Stephanie Inagaki will be hosted Saturday, May 6th, 2017, from 7-11pm at Booth Gallery. The reception is open to the public, and the exhibition is on view through May 27th, 2017.

For inquiries, or to request a collector preview of the exhibition, please email paulboothgallery@gmail.com.

Odd Nerdrum – “In Limbo”

 

Solemorte

Odd Nerdrum, “Solemorte“, oil on canvas, 81″ x 89”

A solo exhibition of works by Odd Nerdrum at the Yu-Hsiu Museum of Art

Organized by Booth Gallery

Exhibition dates: May 7th- August 20th, 2017

 

On Sunday, May 7th, 2017, Booth Gallery is pleased to announce Odd Nerdrum’s first museum solo exhibition in Asia, “In Limbo“. The exhibition, organized by Booth Gallery, will be on view at the Yu-Hsiu Museum of Art through August 8, 2017 “In Limbo” features some of Nerdrum’s most notable work.

Odd Nerdrum’s solo exhibition, In Limbo, takes its title from his painting Limbo, 2006, suggesting that the figures in all his paintings are in limbo. Despite their different appearances and situations, the figures reveal entangled and ambiguous feelings and emotions as well as intriguing situations. According to the Roman Catholic Church, “limbo” is the abode of unbaptized but innocent or righteous souls, as those of infants or virtuous individuals who lived before the coming of Christ. They were not baptized; and because they lacked faith in God, they could never be saved.

In addition, the figures in Nerdrum’s paintings are not great personages. Contrarily, they are ordinary young and aged men and women that form a collective symbol of humanity. They live in the limbo of their own making, find themselves in dangerous situations or in solitude, and the only thing they have in common is that they all suffer. Nerdrum’s delineation of the figures’ expression is metaphoric and predictive; and the desolate landscape that is the backdrop of his paintings foregrounds the humanity he has never stopped portraying. While enshrouding people in a strong sense of detachment, Nerdrum’s work still conveys his humanistic concerns and demonstrates the artistic legacy of past masters, which he has internalized and transformed into his creative philosophy and inspiration.

For a digital exhibition catalogue of the exhibition, please email paulboothgallery@gmail.com.

“A Fool’s Journery” – A solo exhibition of works by Luke Hillestad

Craniopagus 50x60 $20K

Luke Hillestad, “Craniopagus”, oil on canvas, 50” x 60” 

On Saturday, April 1st, Paul Booth Gallery is pleased to present figurative painter Luke Hillestad’s premier solo show in NYC, A Fool’s Journey, on view at 325 W 38 street through April 22nd 2017. The opening Reception will start at 7pm and run until 11pm.

A Fool’s Journey is an explorative visual odyssey through the inner landscapes of human pathology and desire for meaning. The viewer is invited to wander, with the fresh eyes of the Fool, down an arcane path. Along the way, we encounter painted rituals, alchemical symbols, and cast of archetypes bearing qualities of the old but not forgotten. An unpredictable wilderness is the backdrop for the paintings, where the power of the natural elements, the animal kingdom, and forest talismans imbue the narrative. Initiation, desire, and a struggle of will are among the themes explored in Hillestad’s large-scale works, painted with a harmonious Apelles palette.

Luke Hillestad has exhibited his works globally, in Dubai, Paris, Munich, Barcelona, Los Angeles, and Miami. He paints from life, employing friends and loved ones as models, as well as using taxidermied animals, and found natural objects to create his mythologies. Hillestad is currently illustrating Shakespeare’s Macbeth, in a limited-edition collectors book collaboration.

Please email paulboothgallery@gmail.com for press info or exhibition PDF.

Psychological Realism

Sergio Barrale, Daniel Bilodeau, Rune Christensen, Jesse Draxler, Erik Jones, Maria Kreyn, Adam Miller, Jean-Paul Mallozzi, David McLeod, Henrik Uldalen, and Jonathan Viner.

January 21st – February 25th, 2017
Opening Reception Saturday, January 21st from 7p – 11p

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Booth Gallery is pleased to present “Psychological Realism”, a group exhibition that explores the intricacies of identity through depictions of the human body in a range of styles from finely representational to boldly expressional. The exhibition is pleased to present the following eleven artists:

Sergio Barrale, Daniel Bilodeau, Rune Christensen, Jesse Draxler, Erik Jones, Maria Kreyn, Adam Miller, Jean-Paul Mallozzi, David McLeod, Henrik Uldalen, and Jonathan Viner.

Psychological Realism focuses on the artists’ interior motives and creative perspective by offering a glimpse into the mental narrative of the figures portrayed in the art, rather than painting the entire story. The exhibition highlights the figure through different styles of art, as a means of representing the depth and diversity of individuals and their personality. The choice of medium by each artist is as personal as the subject matter, as it is an extension of themselves and functions as the manifestation of their soul for all to see. Despite the differing aesthetics and preferred media, this selection of artists speak the same cutting edge visual language. Their paintings, installations and collages transcend genres and encompass photoreal, surreal and abstract to portray an identity that is visceral, innately familiar and deeply compelling.

The exhibition will be on view January 21st – February 25th, 2017. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, January 21st from 7p – 11p at Booth Gallery – 325 W 38th St. New York, NY 10018.

To request a VIP preview of the exhibition email paulboothgallery@gmail.com.